Ultralight Hiking Backpack to Keep in your Jeep at All Times

Bug-Out-Bag for an Offroad Expedition

Get ready to walk to reach civilization when you can't (or don't want to) get help. It might happen to you because it has happened to me (several times).

 

Every Jeeper traveling alone in the remote wilderness should be ready for a long walk. Here’s how to pack your 4x4 trail backpack the right way.


Jeep Solo Off-Roading

 

Prepare your first expedition with your Jeep in the extreme remote wilderness. Carrying a hiking backpack with water, food, camping gear, and a first aid kit provides an extra level of safety.

 

Bug-out-bag for an off-road expedition


Bug-Out-Bag Jeep Expedition

When I started wandering alone with my Jeep in Yukon, the Northwest Territories, and British Columbia, I had a satellite phone, a CB radio, and a quality airband radio transceiver. I felt safe because I could reach just about anyone I wanted/needed at all times and ask for help. It didn’t take me long to realize that sometimes I didn’t want to ask for help because it was TOO EXPENSIVE.

When you start a long-distance journey in the wilderness, forget about receiving help from your friends and family members. They have jobs, kids, errands to run, and other responsibilities or scheduled activities. Unless you are injured or dying, they won’t travel hundreds of kilometers to bring you a serpentine belt or get you out from a puddle of mud. And if they do, well, you are lucky to be supported by extraordinary people.

But the fact is that asking for help in the wilderness requires to pay for commercial services. And I’ll tell you this: it’s awfully expensive. It’s beyond your imagination. Are you willing to pay $5,000 for a bush pilot to land on the closest lake and bring you a $40 crankshaft position sensor? Or $3,000 upfront (+ $300 per hour) for a tow truck located 100km away to come help you get out from a ditch?

Yes, sometimes it’s possible to get help from very comprehensive conservation officers or First Nations, but people are scarce in remote areas. What about a rescue team? Maybe you don’t want to pay for the helicopter and the whole team (including the dog) just because you’re lost and now out of fuel.

Helicopter Delivery Yukon Parts Jeep

Personally, I once found myself stranded in grizzly territory, and I realized it would be better for my health to bug out by foot (walking on the safest trail). I came back the next day with a bunch of nice guys who helped me to get unstuck (safely), and everything was cool.

Of course, the best thing should be to NEVER HIT THE TRAIL ALONE. But I know you won’t listen because I’m used to encountering solo off-roaders on the trail. And most (99%) don’t have any plan for a long walk. That is why I decided to share the contents of what I call my Jeep Bug-Out-Bag. It weighs only 12.5 lbs (including the backpack itself). Most online articles about B.O.B. have been written by survivalists, not by 4x4 adventurers. My goal is to always be ready for a fast 100km/60mi walk and/or to spend four days and four nights in the wilderness. So, I can go somewhere, get what I need, and even come back to my Jeep by foot. What matters the most is (in decreasing order): 1) Water, 2) Foot Care 3) Calories 4) Restorative Sleep 5) Being found (if you are lost)

 

Backpack
Deuter X-Race 10L
Feet Rest

Foot Blister Kit

Bivy Sack

CoolMax Liner Socks (2x)

Ultralight Sleeping Bag

Smartwool Socks Sleeping Pad
Water Balaclava
Hydration Bladder 1.5L Lighter
2x500ML Spring Water Fire Starters
LifeStraw Filter Mosquito Repellent
Calories Others
Granola Bars Headlamp + Batteries
MRE Military Ration First Aid
Fishing Kit Soap
Total Weight: 12.5 lbs.

Note 1: I know that most long-distance hikers and survivalists won't agree with my strategy. But on my side, I just want to walk fast, get the help/parts/tools/fuel I need, and come back as soon as possible because my Jeep is unattended. I don't want it to be found by looters. Acting fast is the key in the wilderness.

Note 2: Even though it's not on “the list”, bear spray is mandatory. You should carry it at your belt (not attached behind or in the backpack) for a quick access. You wear a warm and rainproof jacket. You have quality hiking boots (waterproof + breathable). And I also recommend you to carry a survival knife that has a compass and a tiny flashlight. Like this one from Survival Pro-1 sold for less than 30$.

 

Survival Pro-1 Knife with Compass and Light

 

Survival Knife Jeep Expedition

Price $20 - $30

Amazon.com
(USA - Canada)

 

The list
20 items / Total weight = 12.5 lbs.

 

1. Deuter X-Race 10L Backpack

Deuter X-Race 10L Backpack Bug out Bag

Compact, ultralight, rainproof, and affordable. It's a genuine ultralight hiking designed for those who need to walk extra long distances. It has a super breathable system that separates the bag from your back. Personally, as long as I keep the weight of B.O.B. under 13 lbs, I don't really feel it on my shoulders.

 

Price $90 - $110
Amazon.ca
(Canada)
Amazon.com
(USA)
Newegg.com
(Worldwide)

 

2. Foot Blister Kit

Blister Foot Care Kit Hiking

It's well-known in the army that foot pain and injuries not only slow soldiers down but it also takes a toll on judgement, combativity, and morale. You need to walk like crazy? You won't regret to bring a Foot Care Kit.

 

Price $10 - $20
Amazon.ca
(Canada)
Amazon.com
(USA)
Newegg.com
(Worldwide)

 

3. Dry CoolMax Liner Socks

Dry CoolMax Liner Socks

Keep your feet dry and prevent toe irritation. Cheap and light. Made of polyester, nylon and spandex. Will dry in 60 minutes on a sunny day if soaked. It's widely used by hockey players too here in Canada.

 

Price $10 - $20
Amazon.ca
(Canada)
Amazon.com
(USA)

 

4. Smartwool Socks

SmartWool Ultralight Socks

Made of genuine wool + elastane. The cushioning is minimal but I like that product for myself because it's incredibly light (1.6 onces for a pair!). High level of elasticity. It's also machine washable.

 

Price $10 - $20
Amazon.ca
(Canada)
Amazon.com
(USA)

 

5. Hydration Bladder 2.0L

Hydration Bladder 1.5L Aquatic Way

This product from Aquatic Way is easy to fill in the bush (it has a huge opening) and doesn't leak (even if you remove the tube). It's also inexpensive ($20) and compact (14''x6.5''x3.75'').

In my humble experience, 2 liters of water is well enough to survive 36 hours (and 16 hours of walking) at two conditions: 1) I hydrate myself properly before leaving my Jeep for good 2) Temperature is below 10 degrees Celsius

Don't forget that water is super heavy. 2 liters of water weighs 4.4 lbs (2 kg). You can't carry a lot and expect to walk fast.

Because I'm normally surrounded by various water sources in Yukon, BC, or Northwest Territories, I make the decision to just carry a small 2.0L bladder.

 

Amazon.ca
(Canada)
Amazon.com
(USA)
Newegg.com
(Worldwide)

 

6. Coming Soon...

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